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Re: [ossig] FOSS Meet



Ken,

> If you can learn independently, you wouldn't get 
> flamed quite as often :)

Perhaps I cared too much. I am doing OK on my own. I
am having a hard time to tell people that linux is
better than the RM5 CDs they got from various places.
I found that impatience, and hard to get information
is a barrier. It won't be long for those who will
reformat their machines out of frusturation. Heck!
they do the same with the other OS too. strangely glad
to reinstall it everytime!

Frequently what sells is openoffice and making their
own PDF... Heh! (some of whom still don't know they
can do the same on windows).. ^_^ 

Nur,

> "Everybody"? That's a little far-reaching. But since
> you mention
> institutions of higher learning, and also
> developers... I base my
> answer with that frame of mind, being a CS student
> myself.

It is. And I am not refering to CS student per se. But
would be degree holder other than CS/IT. And some of
whom dun even owns a computer. CS/IT student who can't
use/develop on multiple operating system, good sign to
change course.

But lets draw a limit: Everybody as in for those who
bought a clone computer, without an OS and can read in
english.

Those are some of the great books u listed there. It
is a bit deep for some.

I am still looking through the materials at
IOSN/UNDP's site to see what is available. It did not
highlight the skills but step by step guide on using
fedora. It is very good. 

Cheers.

--- Nur Hussein <nhussein@gmail.com> wrote:

> > The basic idea is listing essential skills to
> begin
> > using FOSS where everybody can refer to. 
> 
> "Everybody"? That's a little far-reaching. But since
> you mention
> institutions of higher learning, and also
> developers... I base my
> answer with that frame of mind, being a CS student
> myself.
> 
> > The basic idea is listing essential skills to
> begin
> > using FOSS where everybody can refer to. Elements
> in
> > the list for example unix as an operating system,
> why
> > is it important to learn, what is it's feature,
> and
> > where to go next to get those information. We may
> not
> > need to write the whole document, but highlight
> the
> > references. May be books may be sites.
> 
> Books eh? Ah, yes, books. I always recommend the
> classics :)
> 
> To know operating systems in general (as a computer
> scientist):
> 
> 1. Operating Systems: Design and Implementation
> (Second Edition) -
> Andrew Tanenbaum and Albert Woodhull
>    (Prentice Hall, 1997, ISBN 0136386776)
> 
> 2. Operating Systems Concepts - Abraham Silberschatz
> et. al.
>     (Wiley, 2002, ISBN 0471250600)
> 
> 3. Operating Systems: Internals and Design
> Principles (4th Edition) -
> William Stallings
>     (Prentice-Hall, 2000, ISBN 0130319996)
> 
> By no means an exhaustive list, but this is a good
> start :)
> 
> To know Unix in general (as a developer):
> 
> 1. Advanced Programming In The UNIX Environment - W.
> Richard Stevens
>     (Addison-Wesley, 1992, ISBN 0201563177)
> 
> 2a) Unix Network Programming Vol 1, 3rd Edition - W.
> Richard Stevens et. al.
>       (Addison-Wesley, 2003, ISBN 0131411551)
> 
> 2b) Unix Network Programming Vol 2, 2nd Edition - W.
> Richard Stevens
>        (Prentice-Hall, 1998, ISBN 0130810819)
> 
> 3. Programming with POSIX Threads - David R.
> Butenhof 
>     (Addison-Wesley, 1997, ISBN 0201633922)
> 
> To know specific Unix kernels in detail (these are
> implementation
> specific for OSS Unix-like operating systems):
> 
> 1. Understanding The Linux Kernel 2nd Edition* -
> Daniel P. Bovet and
> Marco Cesati
>     (O'Reilly, 2002, ISBN 0596002130)
> 
> 2. Linux Device Drivers 2nd Edition* - Jonathan
> Corbet
>     (O'Reilly, 2001, ISBN 0596000081)
> 
> (*new editions of these books may come out soon; LDD
> by Corbet is also
> available online as a free ebook :
>
http://www.xml.com/ldd/chapter/book/bookindexpdf.html)
> 
> 3. Linux Kernel Development - Robert Love
>     (Sams, 2003, ISBN 0672325128)
> 
> 4. Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager -
> Mel Gorman
>     (Prentice-Hall, 2004, ISBN 0131453483) - will be
> available as a
> free ebook too
> 
> 5. The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD
> Operating System -
> Marshall K. McKusick and George V. Neville-Neil
>     (Addison-Wesley, 2004, ISBN: 0201702452)
> 
> There are other Unix kernel books too for Solaris,
> HP-UX and others too. 
> 
> Books for programming:
> 
> 1. The C Programming Language - Brian Kernighan and
> Dennis Ritchie
> (anyone who doesn't have or haven't referred to this
> book isn't a real
> C programmer)
>     (Prentice-Hall, 1988, ISBN 0131103628)
> 
> 2. The Practice Of Programming - Brian Kernighan and
> Rob Pike
>     (Addison-Wesley, 1999, ISBN 020161586X)
> 
> 3. Advanced C Programming - Peter Van Der Linden
> (highly entertaining book)
>     (Prentice-Hall, 1994, ISBN: 0131774298)
> 
> My knowledge of good books for other languages is
> sketchy, so I can't
> really recommend anything. Someone else can fill in
> the blanks here. I
> assume something by Stroustrup for C++, some Sun
> Press books for
> Java...etc. The O'Reilly books are good for stuff
> like Perl and
> Python.
> 
> Besides this, the general books about algorithms and
> data structures
> and stuff also applies. As a rule of thumb, if
> you've been through a
> reasonably disciplined CS programme, you should have
> everything you
> need to understand free operating systems and get
> cracking on OSS
> development.
> 
> -= Nur Hussein =-
> 
> 
>
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